Phillip Island Challenge Rules

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Phillip Island Challenge Rules

Phillip Island Challenge Rules

Mission Statement: To allow entrants of Team USA to have a place to race and exhibit the machinery in preparation for the International Challenge held annually at the Phillip Island Classic, in Phillip Island, Australia.  To provide machinery of large displacement vintage era engines to have an organization to race with that currently does not exist anywhere else.

**All rules stated below pertain to all motorcycles including 4 stroke and 2 stroke machines**

  1. Period:  The period of machinery eligible includes all motorcycles engines up to and including the year 1984.
    1. Frames may be production, aftermarket, or custom, all built in a safe and workmanlike manner.
  2. Engine Capacity: The following displacements are approved:
    1. 2 Valve engines: 700cc to 1300cc
    2. 4 valve engines: 700cc to 1300cc
    3. Two cylinder engines: 700cc to 1400cc
  3. Wheel Size: The following rim widths apply:
    1. Front wheel maximum rim width of 3.5 inch
    2. Rear wheel maximum rim width of 5.5 inch
  4. Brakes: The following restrictions apply:
    1. Two and Four pot calipers are allowed
    2. Maximum brake rotor size of 340mm
    3. Wave rotors are NOT permitted
    4. Radial brake master cylinders are NOT permitted
  5. Carburetors:
    1. Both round and flatslide carburetors are allowed
    2. Maximum carburetor bore size of 40mm
  6. Forks:
    1. Maximum tube diameter of 43mm
    2. Upside down forks are NOT permitted
  7. Cooling:
    1. 4 stroke engines must be air cooled only
    2. 2 stroke engines can be either air or water cooled
  8. Tires:  The use of the following is approved:
    1. DOT tires
    2. Slick tires
    3. Wet tires
    4. Tire warmers
  9. Electronic Aids:Electronic aids are NOT permitted other than ignition i.e. No quick shifters or traction control
  10. Numbers:  At least 7 inch high numbers, block style, clearly visible and legible
  11. Belly pans:  Mandatory on all bikes as per AHRMA rule 9.3 (f)
  12. Bodywork:  Must maintain the period vintage look. NO modern seat pans or fairings.*THESE RULES MAY OR MAY NOT MIRROR THE PHILLIP ISLAND CHALLENGE RULES. IT IS UPON THE RIDER TO BUILD ELIGIBLE MACHINERY FOR EACH RACE ORGANIZATION.
  13. Examples of eligible machines and not limited to the following:
    Honda CB 750 to 1100, and CBX
    Yamaha TZ 750, Yamaha FJ Series Bikes
    Suzuki GS Series Bikes
    Kawasaki GPZ Series Bikes
    Others OEMs with similar configurations
By |2018-11-08T21:27:34+00:00November 8th, 2018|Road Racing, Rules|4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Matt Hilgenberg November 8, 2018 at 8:28 pm - Reply

    a. The bike that won at the Willow Springs exhibition race this year had a 1986 Yamaha FJ1200 engine — how was it allowed to compete when there’s a 1984 year cut-off?

    b. Is there a displacement limit for two-strokes (min/max)?

    h. Are DOT tires allowed?

    l. Mr. Chairman’s going to wig-out when he sees the word “legal” in an AHRMA rule. 🙂

    • Matt Hilgenberg November 10, 2018 at 8:09 pm - Reply

      This comment was submitted on November 8, and items ‘h’ and ‘l’ were addressed immediately, thank you for doing so.

      The comment was then made public on November 10 — I am still curious about items ‘a’ and ‘b’, which can easily be addressed by adding “and like design” to ‘a’ and placing some sort of acknowledgement of two-strokes in ‘b’.

      Cheers,

  2. Luke Conner November 11, 2018 at 7:58 pm - Reply

    The bike that won at Williw was like design,

    DOT tyres are allowed

    And yes the word legal changed to eligible,

    Thank you

    • Matt Hilgenberg November 12, 2018 at 10:08 am - Reply

      Now if you’d just add “like design” to item ‘a’ and acknowledge two-strokes in item ‘b’ (as I suggested in June to the gentleman who wrote the rules and in July to the rules committee and in October to the Board) — you’ll have a reasonably-complete rules set that’s *okay enough* for the Handbook…

      Viva!

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